Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States of America

Chapter Search • Convention InformationVFW History • VFW Membership Requirements

VFW Mission Statement: The objectives of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution are promoting historic preservation, education and patriotism. We accomplish our mission through over 2,700 chapters in the US and twelve foreign countries. Our Americana Collection houses over 5,000 documents focusing on early America. The DAR Library includes 160,000 volumes of genealogical information. The DAR Museum, which is free and open to the public, is home to a collection of over 30,000 objects and 31 Period Rooms prior to 1840.

VFW Mission Motto: God, Home, and Country

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States of America (VFW) National Headquarters
VFW HQ Address/VFW Map: VFW Online
1776 D Street NW
Washington, D.C. 20006
Twitter icon YOUTube
Telephone: (202) 628 1776 Make a donation VFW EIN: 43-1758998
VFW Date Founded: 1899
VFW Congressionally Chartered: May 28, 1936 36 U.S. Code Chapter 2301
VFW Leadership: Brian J. Duffy
Commander-in-Chief: Brian J. Duffy
VFW Website
VFW Webshot

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VFW History:
The VFW was reorganized in 1913 as the result of a series of mergers of previous veterans organizations which consisted of veterans of the Spanish–American War and the Philippine Insurrection.[citation needed] The VFW modeled its organization, terminology and ritual on the Grand Army of the Republic—an organization for veterans of all ranks who had served in the American Civil War, but kept the “foreign” aspect of the organization, which excluded Civil War veterans. The VFW grew rapidly after the First World War with hundreds of thousands eligible veterans returning from the war.[citation needed] As the American Legion was originally composed exclusively of First World War veterans, this led to a friendly rivalry between the VFW and the American Legion as they competed for members and recognition as the premier veterans organization in the United States.[citation needed]

Between the two world wars, the VFW focused on advocating for benefits for veterans as well as combating communism.[citation needed] After the Second World War, millions more veterans were eligible to join the VFW. Membership steadily grew after the war peaking at about 2.5 million in 1993 with over 10,000 posts (local chapters) being established nationwide.[citation needed] During the turbulent 1960s era, the VFW supported the American involvement in the Vietnam War and condemned the counterculture trends of the era.[citation needed] Many VFW posts were unwilling to accept Vietnam veterans afterwards, but became more open to them as older veterans died off or their health did not permit them to attend meetings.

By the 2000s, the VFW faced a membership crisis due to the aging of World War II and Korean War veterans and the lack of enrollment from veterans of more recent conflicts.


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VFW Membership Eligibility Requirements:
The fundamental difference between our organization and other veterans organizations, and one in which we take great pride, is our eligibility qualifications.

VFW welcomes all who meet our eligibility criteria. It’s through service to this country that all our membership has earned their elite status.

If you have received a campaign medal for overseas service; have served 30 consecutive or 60 non-consecutive days in Korea; or have ever received hostile fire or imminent danger pay, then you’re eligible to join our ranks.

On the Web: http://www.vfw.org/join

Number of Chapters: 3,385
Members: 1,234,985


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VFW National Headquarters Map


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36 U.S. Code Chapter 2301 – VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS OF THE UNITED STATES

§ 230101 – Organization
(a)Federal Charter.—
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (in this chapter, the “corporation”), a national association of veterans who as soldiers, sailors, marines, and airmen served this Nation in wars, campaigns, and expeditions on foreign soil or in hostile waters, is a federally chartered corporation.
(b)Perpetual Existence.—
Except as otherwise provided, the corporation has perpetual existence.

§ 230102 – Purposes
The purposes of the corporation are fraternal, patriotic, historical, charitable, and educational, and are—
(1) to preserve and strengthen comradeship among its members;
(2) to assist worthy comrades;
(3) to perpetuate the memory and history of our dead, and to assist their surviving spouses and orphans;
(4) to maintain true allegiance to the Government of the United States, and fidelity to its Constitution and laws;
(5) to foster true patriotism;
(6) to maintain and extend the institutions of American freedom; and
(7) to preserve and defend the United States from all enemies.

§ 230103 – Membership
An individual is eligible for membership in the corporation only if the individual served honorably as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States—
(1) in a foreign war, insurrection, or expedition in service that—
(A) has been recognized as campaign-medal service; and
(B) is governed by the authorization of the award of a campaign badge by the United States Government;
(2) on the Korean peninsula or in its territorial waters for at least 30 consecutive days, or a total of 60 days, after June 30, 1949; or
(3) in an area which entitled the individual to receive special pay for duty subject to hostile fire or imminent danger under section 310 of title 37.

§ 230104 – Powers
The corporation may—
(1) adopt and amend a constitution, bylaws, and regulations to carry out the purposes of the corporation;
(2) adopt and alter a corporate seal;
(3) establish and maintain offices to conduct its activities;
(4) make contracts;
(5) acquire, own, lease, encumber, and transfer property as necessary and appropriate to carry out the purposes of the corporation;
(6) establish, regulate, and discontinue subordinate State and territorial subdivisions and local chapters or posts;
(7) publish a magazine and other publications;
(8) sue and be sued; and
(9) do any other act necessary and proper to carry out the purposes of the corporation.

§ 230105 – Exclusive right to name, seal, emblems, and badges
The corporation has the exclusive right to use the name “Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States” and its corporate seal and to manufacture and use emblems and badges the corporation adopts.

§ 230106 – Service of process
As a condition to the exercise of any power or privilege granted by this chapter, the corporation shall file, with the secretary of state or other designated official of each State, the name and address of an agent in that State on whom legal process or demands against the corporation may be served.

§ 230107 – Annual report
Not later than January 1 of each year, the corporation shall submit a report to Congress on the activities of the corporation during the prior fiscal year. The report may not be printed as a public document.

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Annual National Meeting:

118th VFW National Convention
When: July 22-26, 2017
Where: New Orleans, La., “The Big Easy”

Approximately 10,000 VFW and Auxiliary members will convene from all over the world at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, July 22-26, 2017. VFW members will vote on organizational by-laws, attend workshops, network with other veterans and attend business sessions. Convention delegates will also enjoy addresses from several notable and distinguished guests.

New Orleans is one of the world’s most fascinating cities – it’s home to a truly unique melting pot of culture, food and music. From world-famous restaurants to hidden music clubs, as one of America’s most culturally and historically-rich destinations, New Orleans has something to discover at every turn. Follow your instincts, your rhythm, your flavor and fun to discover the heart, soul and spirit of the city.

Convention housing is open now. Make your reservation today!

Click for information:


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